v

您的位置:VeryCD音乐古典音乐

音乐资源事务区


Howard Shelley -《塔贝尔格、皮克西斯 浪漫的钢琴协奏曲,第58集》(J.P. Pixis & Thalberg - The Hyperion Romantic Piano Concerto series Vol. 58)[FLAC]

  • 状态: 精华资源
  • 摘要:
    古典类型奏鸣曲
    发行时间2012年11月13日
  • 时间: 2015/01/02 15:16:39 发布 | 2015/01/04 11:49:06 更新
  • 分类: 音乐  古典音乐 

alanfish

精华资源: 2006

全部资源: 2007

相关: 分享到新浪微博   转播到腾讯微博   分享到开心网   分享到人人   分享到QQ空间   订阅本资源RSS更新   美味书签  subtitle
该内容尚未提供权利证明,无法提供下载。
专辑英文名J.P. Pixis & Thalberg - The Hyperion Romantic Piano Concerto series Vol. 58
专辑中文名塔贝尔格、皮克西斯 浪漫的钢琴协奏曲,第58集
艺术家Howard Shelley
古典类型奏鸣曲
资源格式FLAC
发行时间2012年11月13日
地区美国
语言英语
简介

IPB Image

专辑介绍:

【hyperion】Romantic Piano Concerto Vol.58 浪漫的钢琴协奏曲,第58集(Howard Shelley)
浪漫钢琴协奏曲系列第58集,收录两位作曲家兼钢琴家塔贝尔格、皮克西斯的作品,两人也都为李斯特的钢琴作品六日谈贡献部份段落。2012年除了是德布西的150週年诞辰,也是塔贝尔格两百週年诞辰,但是所有的光彩似乎都放在前者。

塔贝尔格曾被认为是最顶尖的钢琴家,锋芒一度盖过李斯特。1830年代定居於巴黎的义大利公主贝吉欧裘索经常於当地举办沙龙,结识不少文人与艺术家。1837年她举办慈善音乐会邀请两人来场钢琴比试,证明谁才是天下第一。但是公主毕竟不是当假的,外交辞令该如何使用倒是相当瞭然於胸,她的评语是「塔贝尔格是最伟大的钢琴家,但是世上只有一个李斯特」,当真是谁也不得罪。

塔贝尔格只写过一首钢琴协奏曲,而且是在他青年时期,然而这首作品却完全没有任何年轻人会有的青涩感,足以让任何钢琴家用来作为夸示技巧或是耐力的好作品,然而这首乐曲从头到尾双手几乎没有离开钢琴,对演奏者本身当然也是不小的考验。

一如多数本系列的19世纪早期作曲家相同,约翰.彼得.皮克西斯也是被遗忘在历史的洪流之中。李斯特的六日谈原先是为了在上述慈善音乐会演出所写,以贝里尼的歌剧「清教徒」中的进行曲为主题,邀请萧邦、彻尔尼、赫兹、皮克西斯和塔贝尔格五人分别写一段变奏,最后由他负责汇整编写。然而这首乐曲最后并未如期交稿,於是才改为上述的钢琴比试音乐。但若不是因为这个缘故,皮克西斯或许便完全消失於历史上,其实他曾在巴黎帮塔贝尔格上过几堂钢琴课。

他的钢琴协奏曲和钢琴小协奏曲,炫目而迷人,也是世界首次录音。

本辑同样由霍华.薛利弹奏钢琴同时指挥塔斯马尼亚交响乐团。

专辑编号: CDA67915
专辑类型: 单CD
发行年份: 2012
国际条码: 0034571179155
音乐家:
Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra 塔斯马尼亚交响乐团 Howard Shelley, piano 霍华.薛利, 钢琴
音乐厂牌: Hyperion


COMPOSER: Johann Peter Pixis (other composers in brackets after works)
TITLE: The Romantic Piano Concerto volume 58
TRACKS: Piano Concerto in C major opus 100. Piano Concertino in E flat major opus 68

(JOHANN PETER PIXIS). Piano Concerto in F minor opus 5 (SIGISMOND THALBERG).
ORCHESTRA: Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra
CONDUCTOR: Howard Shelley
ARTISTS: Howard Shelley

CDA67915


This 58th volume of the Romantic Piano Concerto series presents two composer-pianists
who contributed to Liszt’s piano extravaganza Hexaméron (1837).

Thalberg (who would be celebrating his 200th birthday in 2012) famously took part in a pianistic ‘duel’ with Liszt, and was popularly acclaimed as the greatest pianist in the world during his lifetime. He only wrote one piano concerto, and that in his teens, but it is a brilliantly effective showpiece for virtuosity and stamina, the pianist’s hands barely leaving the piano. Johann Peter Pixis has now been consigned perhaps unfairly to the oblivion where so many early 19thcentury composers dwell.

These are world premiere recordings of his charming Piano Concerto and Piano Concertino.
Howard Shelley, undisputed master of the music of the early Romantic period, directs the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra from the keyboard with his usual insouciance and poise.

This 58th volume of the Romantic Piano Concerto series presents two composer-pianists
who contributed to the Hexameron, Liszt's collaborative piano extravaganza. Thalberg (who would be celebrating his 200th birthday in 2012) famously took part in a pianistic ''duel'' with Liszt, and was popularly acclaimed as the greatest pianist in the world during his lifetime. He only wrote one piano concerto, and that in his teens, but it is a brilliantly effective showpiece for virtuosity and stamina, the pianist's hands barely leaving the piano. Johann Peter Pixis has now been consigned - perhaps unfairly - to the oblivion where so many early 19th century composers dwell.

These are world premiere recordings of his charming Piano Concerto and Piano Concertino. Howard Shelley, an undisputed master of the music of the early Romantic period, directs the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra from the keyboard with his usual insouciance and poise.

Performer: Howard Shelley
Orchestra: Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra
Conductor: Howard Shelley
Composer: Johann Peter Pixis, Sigismond Thalberg
Audio CD (November 13, 2012)
Number of Discs: 1
Format: Import
Label: Hyperion
ASIN: B0097LP16G

引用
Published on November 8, 2012
The Romantic Piano Concerto – Vol. 58 = PIXIS: Piano Concerto in C Major;
Concertino in E-flat Major; THALBERG: Piano Concerto in F Minor – Tasmanian Sym. Orch. /Howard
Shelley, p. and cond. – Hyperion
Buy this product on Amazon.com

The Romantic Piano Concerto – Vol. 58 = PIXIS: Piano Concerto in C Major, Op. 100;
Concertino in E-flat Major, Op. 68; THALBERG: Piano Concerto in F Minor, Op. 5 – Tasmanian Sym. Orch. /Howard Shelley, p. and cond. – Hyperion CDA67915, 70:10 [Distr. by Harmonia mundi] ****:

Johann Peter Pixis (1788-1874), pianist and pedagogue, may be recalled as the dedicatee of the Fantasy on Polish Airs, Op. 13 of Chopin. Pixis counts among the contributors to Liszt’s inflated extravaganza Hexameron (1837), and he coached the younger virtuoso Sigismond Thalberg in Paris. Howard Shelley (rec. 10-14 May 2011) extends his survey into neglected keyboard literature with the 1829 Piano Concerto in C Major by Pixis, rather delicately scored – even in its quasi-martial first movement fanfares and dotted rhythmic sallies – alternating with rather conventional fioritura that warbles or cascades in the salon fashion of Paris that marks the Chopin concertos and their cushioned orchestral support. The Allegro moderato continues by assuming the form of a nocturne – con molto espessione – that modulates to the supertonic before resolving into the home C Major. In its more agitated episodes, the writing certainly has the national pomp we know from Hummel and Chopin, though the intellectual content remains meager. Shelley himself proves infinitely deft at the various flourishes, running passages, and broken staccati taken at an impressively brisk clip. The coda sounds like a transposition of a Paganini fanfare attached to bold piano work in Parisian style.

The Adagio cantabile, opening in the 12/8 signature and aerial A-flat Major, sets forth another nocturne in the John Field mode. The leggier filigree might share procedures with the Chopin model in the F Minor Concerto; even a dark color infiltrates the proceedings that lead to showy cadenza. Without preliminaries, we are thrown into a 2/4 Allegretto scherzando of rather jaunty character. The writing may be glibly superficial, but it bubbles with bravura confidence. Nice woodwind accompaniment urges the music forward, glistening and virtuosically shallow. The perky rondo moves gracefully to the A-flat Major of the second movement, the winds, strings, and horns in sprightly colors. Introducing the coda, a horn motif signifies “Waltzing Matilda” so that the piano can institute yet another series of gliding runs that helter-skelter lead to the pompous final chords.

Pixis composed his three-movement Concertino in E-flat Major c. 1824, and much of it at first resembles a woodwind serenade. The keyboard enters well past two minutes into the opening Allegro moderato with a resoluto tune that soon picks up pizzicato strings. The bravura filigree sets in , and we might think this is a potpourri by Weber. The right hand treble line moves the piece forward, and its lightness and finesse seem a cross between Chopin, Mendelssohn, and our idea of later Saint-Saens. The orchestral tutti segues directly into the Adagio sostenuto in B-flat Major. Between soft cellos and later solo horn – extensive enough to wish Dennis Brain had recorded it – the 3/4 pulse generates tender nostalgia and numerous trills. An ornamental parlando episode sets us up for the Rondo: Allegretto almost Schubertian in its lightly debonair character.

Sigismond Thalberg (1812-1871) rivaled Liszt as the most polished piano virtuoso of his time, and his one piano concerto, modeled on Weber and Hummel, names the latter as its dedicatee. The F Minor Concerto (1830) relishes the stamina of the solo pianist, demanding his constant pplication for all but twenty-two bars of music. Thalberg mixes two main themes, rife with octaves and thirds, staccato and glissando alternations, and ascending trills. A fascinating sequence involves a series of staccati and tremolandi that seem stolen from Schubert’s Der Erlkoenig. The dark and light shift in a dramatically symphonic manner reminiscent of the Weber Konzertstuck.

The first movement gradually, circuitously, moves to F Major and a flashy cadenza that exploits Thalberg’s patented three-hand effects. A brief Adagio opens with woodwind scoring that could have led to the Waltz of the Flowers. Instead, it’s all roulades and glitter, sensitive but strictly glass for a vanity case. The bold rhetoric that announces the last movement, Rondo: Allegro, initiates a chain of acrobatic effects set as two themes, one in major and one in minor. A natural showpiece, the Rondo revels in its own finesse, a pianist’s equivalent of a Paganini violin concerto finale. A knotty few measures before the coda demand staccato octaves in each hand with a cluster of triplets, just to keep a soloist digitally alert.


Quite a workout for any self-styled virtuoso!

Sound quality, courtesy of Simon Eadon, remains true to Hyperion’s best form. [Can you believe this is Volume 58 of the Hyperion Piano Concerto Series?…Ed.]

—Gary Lemco









16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Packing a Punch with Spirited Bravura
By Luke Agati on November 13, 2012
For those who relish the music of Weber, Hummel, Moscheles or Kalkbrenner, this latest release will make one wonder why Pixis has not been offered on CD a long while back. Credited with over 100 publications, remembered if at all by his set of variations on a Diabelli waltz, (and yes, Beethoven too wrote a set), he contributed to Liszt's Hexameron, was hailed as one of the most outstanding concert pianists and composers of his day and was respected by Chopin and Liszt. This latest release of Volume 58 from The Romantic Piano Concerto series has proved that Pixis too has suffered his share of unfair neglect. Other than playing before the masses, Johann Peter Pixis appeared before royalty, dukes and duchesses and other aristocratic patrons before his popularity faded when he retired early from public life. For those who benefit from a little background on the working composer and relevant compositions in liner notes, I've provided a few brief but interesting historical particulars, which do not appear in the booklet, concerning the London premieres of these concertos and a curious Austrian association while visiting the capital.

At the height of his European career in the mid 1820s, he was well known to music lovers in Britain by a substantial output of piano pieces that appeared from the publishing house of Clementi from 1824. Many were best sellers, like his variations on Robin Adair. Before visiting London, concert performances of his works were given at the capital from 1825; remarkably most by women. The first was by a Delphine De Schauroth (probably a Pixis pupil from Paris). A year later, the London premiere of his Piano Concertino Op. 68 was given by an RAM student named Miss. Durrell at the Hanover Square Rooms on 6 December 1826. In addition, the English premiere of his Piano Concerto Op.100 (1829) was given at the same venue on 5 August 1831 by a Madame De Belleville (presumably another French pupil). Pixis made his London debut in late April 1828. He also appeared at the Musical Festival in Cambridge, the Commemoration Concerts in Oxford and appeared with other European celebrities who were performing in London. The most notable highlight of his visit, however, was the patronage he received from Prince (& Princess) Esterhazy (the son of Haydn's patron) and Prince Leopold of Austria, who were visiting the English capital at this time. Curiously, one wonders if this Austrian visit was the trigger from which inspired Pixis to write his second piano concerto that he dedicated to Austrian royalty in the following year.

Regarding this latest Hyperion release, this world premiere recording of his two piano concertos Opp.68 and 100 is simply magnificent; the concertos are melodically intense; they are stunning, they stimulate the senses and are deeply lyrical. Although these works will probably never be at the forefront with those of Hummel, Moscheles or Beethoven, they still possess that captivating appeal, which had made them popular in their day. There is little doubt as to why Howard Shelley holds the distinction as being one of the most favoured interpreters of early romantic piano music of our time. With remarkable excellence he effortlessly delivers an unusual array of striking forms which Pixis had skilfully crafted; aided by the judicious playing of the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra. Shelley embraces `unexpected modulations', `nocturne-like themes' (reminiscent of John Field) `exquisite' subject matter and `conversational counterpoint' among a host of other attractive early romantic features. Using a phrase from an eye witness on Pixis's London debut, here Shelley too is `like a daring sportsman'. With `intrepid' nature, he exhibits wonderful brilliancy, superb accuracy and clear articulation with outstanding fervour and dashing energy. What more can one expect! As for the Thalberg concerto, Shelley now holds first place. Many may disagree, considering that there two fine renditions on CD by Michael Ponti and by Francesco Nicolosi (on the Vox and Naxos labels respectively), both of which are certainly well played and from which recordings I also own. In short, however, it's the flair of Shelley's performance and precision of his interpretation that I find most convincing and attractive. If you are a follower of the Hyperion Romantic Piano Concerto series or a fan of piano concertos in general, you'll be amazed and consider the marvel in this compilation. Let's hope that Pixis's only symphony, a double concerto for piano and violin, as well as several chamber pieces, also scored for piano, will not be too far away from the CD catalogue. This latest Hyperion release packs a punch with spirited bravura. Bravo Hyperion! Encore Howard Shelley and the TSO.


IPB Image

IPB Image



专辑曲目

Volume 58: J.P. Pixis & Thalberg (Shelley) (2012)

Piano Concerto C-dur, op. 100 (1829)
01. I. Allegro moderato [13:19]
02. II. Adagio cantabile [03:57]
03. III. Rondo. Allegretto scherzando [08:55]

Piano Concerto Es-dur, op. 68 (ок. 1824)
04. I. Allegro moderato [05:51]
05. II. Adagio sostenuto [05:43]
06. III. Rondo. Allegretto [06:44]

Piano Concerto f-moll, op. 5 (ок. 1830)
07. I. Allegro maestoso [12:12]
08. II. Adagio [03:21]
09. III. Rondo. Allegro [10:03]

正在读取……

这里是其它用户补充的资源(我也要补充):

暂无补充资源
正在加载,请稍等...

点击查看所有65网友评论

 

(?) [公告]留口水、评论相关规则 | [活动]每日签到 轻松领取电驴经验

    小贴士:
  1. 类似“顶”、“沙发”之类没有营养的文字,对勤劳贡献的楼主来说是令人沮丧的反馈信息。
  2. 提问之前请再仔细看一遍楼主的说明,或许是您遗漏了。
  3. 勿催片。请相信驴友们对分享是富有激情的,如果确有更新版本,您一定能搜索到。
  4. 请勿到处挖坑绊人、招贴广告。既占空间让人厌烦,又没人会搭理,于人于己都无利。
  5. 如果您发现自己的评论不见了,请参考以上4条。